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Dear Parliamentarian Vol. 111 June 2005

Dear Parliamentarian Vol. 111  June  2005
Answers to your Parliamentary Questions
drvideo@comcast.net


"Dear Parliamentarian" is written by the author of Parliamentary Procedures Made Simple: The Basics, an 80 minute video that tells how to have better meetings.


Virginia Barron wrote:

I belong to a ladies organization, with bylaws, and one of the members states that if bylaws are "blotched" there is a possibility of a lawsuit.  Who sues who?

 

Thank you.

 

 

Dear Virginia,
    Could you give me a better example.  The only time that  a law suit may be possible is when a member feels her rights have been taken away by some action of the assembly based upon the bylaws, and the bylaws conflict with the corporation papers (if the organization is incorporated) or  with the corporate code in the state in which it is incorporated.  Bylaws are the governing documents of an organization.  Courts usually uphold bylaws even if they do not conform with the standard order of bylaws as found in parliamentary authorities.  Most people don't bring a suit unless they have had rights taken away from them.  People don't bring organizations to court because they think the bylaws are not correct.  Again the only time courts get involved with organizations is when the organization is incorporated.  Does that apply to your "ladies organization?"

The Parliamentarian


KlausIG@aol.com wrote:

Can you please help me out today?

 

According to our by-laws, our nominating committee brought in 10 names for our Board of Directors.  At the appropriate time, 3 more names were nominated by the membership-at-large.  Only 10 will be elected.

 

Question:  On the printed ballot, should all 13 names be printed alphabetically OR should the ballot state which 10 names were nominated by the Nominating committee and which 3 names were nominated by the floor?

 

Thank you very much.  We do need to know by today.

Mrs. Klaus    KlausIG@aol.com

 

 

 

Dear Mrs. Klaus,
     List them alphabetically.  It doesn't matter who nominated them.  The most important thing to consider is are those nominated by the floor willing to serve and do they meet the qualifications for office.

The Parliamentarian